Tag Archives: facial collpase

Should I Keep My Last Two Teeth?

I am about to have another tooth extracted. This will leave me with only my two front teeth on my upper arch. They are fairly healthy and should last a good while. Most of my lower teeth are still there. I am wearing a partial denture right now to accommodate the upper partial. It’s really uncomfortable and makes it difficult to talk. Because I can eat everything but meat with it, I rarely put it on, unless I am going somewhere to socialize. Some people are telling me that I would probably be happier with a complete upper denture instead of my partial. There aren’t really people I know who have been in this situation where I can ask them if they thought removing those last two teeth was worth it. Have you an opinion on this issue? I’m kind of torn and having a hard time making my mind up. It’s not like I can change my mind after extracting those last two teeth.

Brent

Dear Brent,

Implant Overdentures

I am going to start with a tiny disclaimer that I can only give you general principles here. I don’t have your x-rays and haven’t examined you, so I am strictly going off the information you have provided me with.

In almost all cases it is better to preserve as many natural teeth as possible. That being said, your situation is unique. Yes, those two front teeth are healthy, but they are all you are eating with most of the time and the stresses on them will be tremendous. I don’t think they will last as long as you are hoping. In your case, I am going to suggest that you remove those last two upper teeth and replace the entire arch.

Tooth Replacement Options

The ideal would be for you to replace those teeth with implant overdentures. That would mean getting four to six dental implants and then anchoring a complete dentures to them. It is the most secure replacement possible. The only real downside to them is their expense.

Facial Collapse

The effects of facial collapse.

If these were your bottom teeth, I would tell you to do everything possible to ensure you get the implant supported dentures. This is because when your teeth are removed, your body immediately begins to resorb the minerals in your jawbone to redistribute them elsewhere in your body. With your bottom teeth, this is devastating. Not only does it age your appearance by decades, but your bottom denture simply rests upon your jawbone for its base. After ten or so years, you will not have enough bone left to retain your dentures. This is known as facial collapse.

Because you are dealing with your upper teeth, you are at a slight advantage. These are h eld in by suction and not your jawbone, so you will have more security and retention. Getting complete dentures in this case will be okay if you cannot afford the implant overdentures.

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